Proof

Proof

The Science of Booze

Book - 2014
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Presents a look at the science of alcohol production and consumption, from the principles behind the fermentation, distillation, and aging of alcoholic beverages, to the psychology and neurobiology of what happens after it is consumed.
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2014
Boston :, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt,, 2014
Description: 264 pages ; 24 cm
ISBN: 9780547897967
0547897960
Branch Call Number: 663.1 Rog
Additional Contributors: Rogers, Adam, 1970- Proof

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fissionchips
Oct 01, 2018

p169 "Your basic carbohydrate--bread, let's say--clocks in at 4.1kcal/g, but ethanol nearly doubles that. Of course, those calories are largely empty, without vitamins, minerals, or proteins along for the ride. That's a good argument to drink beer, I guess. It's full of protein. Or you could order cocktails made with fresh juice, especially since people who drink get up to 10 percent of their total calorie intake from ethanol. Alcoholics get up to 50%."

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fissionchips
Oct 01, 2018

p119: "Barrels full of booze are exciting places, chemically speaking. Of the structural components of wood, cellulose and hemicellulose are giant chains of repeating glucose molecules, and the heat of coppering breaks those into sugars--glucose, hexose, and pentose. But the third component, lignin, is different. It's a massive molecule, too, but with nonrepeating subunits. About half of them are vanillin (vanilla flavoured), and the rest is barbecue-flavored guaiacyl, clove-flavored eugenol, and syringaldehyde. At high heat, the spicy aromatic aldehydes in the lignin undergo Maillard reactions and yield the same flavors as browned meat."

f
fissionchips
Oct 01, 2018

p53: "Just like yeast, nobody isolated and identified koji until the late 1800s --1876, to be specific. Yeast was the first living organism to have its genes sequenced, in 1996; koji didn't get its turn until 2005. What gene jockeys found was a microorganism 20 million years old, yet suited to a thoroughly modern process. It makes ten proteases, beloved by soy sauce and miso makers for breaking down protein-laden soybeans; and it makes three distinct alpha-amylases, which sake brewers depend on to saccharify rice.

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fissionchips
Sep 30, 2018

p48: "Brewers and whisky makers use barley because it's easy. Other grains are maltable, but wheat, for example, produces less starch-breaking enzyme. Oats have too much protein and fat. Corn needs too much heat to untangle the starches before malting, and the oils tend to turn rancid. Barley is the way to go."

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DPLjosie Apr 12, 2018

A fascinating read on the science and history of alcohol. Sometimes the science was a little beyond me, but the anecdotes and history were deeply interesting. Now if I could just remember everything I read to share at my next cocktail party...

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bakkerdavid
Apr 04, 2016

A fun romp through breweries and bars alike. A great cocktail of history, science, and sociology.

d
d047373761
Aug 30, 2014

Fascinating reading for oenophiles and connoisseurs of fine booze in general.

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d047373761
Aug 30, 2014

d047373761 thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

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