Mambo in Chinatown

Mambo in Chinatown

Large Print - 2014
Average Rating:
7
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"Twenty-two-year-old Charlie Wong, having grown up in New York's Chinatown as the older daughter of a Beijing ballerina and a noodle maker, is torn between her family duties in Chinatown and her escape into the world of ballroom dancing."--Provided by publisher.
Publisher: Thorndike, Maine :, Center Point Large Print,, 2014
Edition: Center Point Large Print edition
Description: 479 pages (large print) ; 23 cm
ISBN: 9781628991697
1628991690
Branch Call Number: LP Kwok
Additional Contributors: Kwok, Jean. Mambo in Chinatown

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i
iamirak
Aug 19, 2017

The parts I enjoyed the most were the ones in which I learned about Chinese traditions and culture.

f
Fishpantspeacock
Jul 11, 2016

I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this book. It was a quick light book.

w
Wong_Anne
Jun 16, 2015

The tug-of-war between traditional immigrant parents and their North American born children is very real, but unless the book is set in the 20th century, I felt that this hand was overplayed, particularly for a 22-year-old. Additionally, the characters' lack of computer availability to research information made the book feel dated. Having said that, the segments that dealt with dance seemed quite smoothly written - although the likelihood that an inadequate receptionist could become a professional dance instructor was a bit exaggerated. It is , however a Cinderella story for Charlie. As for Lisa, not so lucky. I enjoyed the story. The romance plot was well choreographed, the sub-score with Ryan and his boxing mates was offbeat, and a (mostly) happy ending is fine.

soblessed59 Mar 27, 2015

I enjoy books that show other cultures,and Mambo In Chinatown showed two American-Chinese sisters and their struggle of trying to acclimate fully into American culture when they have a father and an uncle who are steadfastly anchored to old-school China.

The author skillfully develops the characters,and the story.

I immediately loved Charlie and her little sister Lisa,and I was totally captivated by their story.

I also thoroughly enjoyed the insights to Chinese culture,even though I was totally grossed out by the uncle's disgusting-gag-a-maggot health remedies,that would have made me run away from home!

The story is told with much humor and charm.

Highly recommended for those who enjoy a feel-good story

a
amfwriter
Jan 13, 2015

***** Charlie, the older daughter of an old-school overworked and underpaid widowed Chinese man, comes of age at great risk to the thin fabric that holds her struggling family together -- only to resew it with tensile-strength thread. By itself, the description of her interview at the dance studio is worth the time to read the whole book -- but that's only one one gem in a sparkling charm bracelet of a novel. Also, check out Kwok's emotion-tugging debut novel, Girl in Translation, about impoverished Chinese immigrants who become indentured servants to family members as the price of their tickets.

u
Uniticchi
Aug 11, 2014

Fascinating look behind the scenes of professional ballroom dancing -- an "ugly duckling" becomes a swan in spite of herself.

d2013 Jul 07, 2014

This is a great book. Can't help but pull for "Charlie" as she grows into her own. Recommended!

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