Political Tribes

Political Tribes

Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations

Book - 2018
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Discusses the failure of America's political elites to recognize how group identities drive politics both at home and abroad, and outlines recommendations for reversing the country's foreign policy failures and overcoming destructive political tribalism at home.
Publisher: New York :, Penguin Press,, 2018
Description: 293 pages ; 24 cm
Copyright Date: ©2018
ISBN: 9780399562853
0399562850
9780525559047
Branch Call Number: 327 Chu
Additional Contributors: Chua, Amy. Political tribes

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2
21288004246712
Jul 05, 2018

Trump is a fan of the WWE; that explains a lot

j
Jhetto
Jun 05, 2018

Chua distils a complex concept into an easily understandable, ideologically balanced, and thoroughly entertaining read. Tribes are clearly providing the social cohesion we once derived from nation states, and we ignore them at our peril.

r
randalljay
Apr 23, 2018

She describes a super-group as one made up of multiple smaller groups (ethnic, religious, etc.) which as a group have a common theme that pulls them together. For her the U.S. is the only one in the world. She apparently knows little about Canada and so I wonder how much she doesn't know about the rest of the world.
The best parts are the early chapters on how poorly the U.S. has done on the international front - mainly Viet Nam and Iraq..well done, concise summaries.
Worth a read - not too long.

v
voisjoe1_0
Apr 04, 2018

This book introduces the concept of political tribes by briefly discussing the tribes that are players in the problems of Brexit, France, Germany and Trump. Then it devotes more extensively the past errors of American foreign policy because of our ignorance of tribes in Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Venezuela (America's foreign policy "experts" too Anglo centric to understand how to deal with the tribalism?). The book then briefly discusses the two basic tribes in America - the white working class in middle-America/the South and the more diverse class basically in the two coasts and in the urban areas.

s
StarGladiator
Mar 09, 2018

Whenever I read or hear Amy Chua, professor at Yale and Tiger Mom character, and her husband, I think on how profoundly stupid they sound!
We are all born equally ignorant, but to remain so, after the age of 30 or 35, denotes one as profoundly stupid - - no other description suffices.
Chua's latest book reinforces her profoundly stupid image, perfectly capturing her habitually oblivious mental state and pure non sequitur writing form!
Having read and heard countless episodes of American workers being replaced wholesale by foreign nationals [or foreign visa replacement workers] and/or their jobs being offshored - - and to read/hear the Ivey League illiterati choose to ignore and willfully remain ignorant of these facts, Chua's pointless drivel and murky meanderings come as no surprise - - simply another futile exercise in tree wastage to drive her ego-fueld inanity!
Recent surveys strongly suggest that as much as 90 percent of the job growth over the past 10 years can be attributed to the // gig economy \\, i.e., Taskrabbit, Uber, Lyft, et cetera, et cetera. [For those still uninformed about Taskrabbit and similar so-called high tech employment; its purpose is to reduce work time down to 15 and 10-minute intervals so as to pay workers and laborers as little money as possible!]
Chua and hubby no doubt are oblivious to such Reality or heartily welcome it!

b
boogalou
Mar 04, 2018

I'm sure this has been covered before. However, Amy Chua makes the process of understanding the tribal conflicts around the globe simple to understand. She really does not give us a solution to the problems except by believing in the American dream and communicating with each other. George Carlin best explained the American Dream by stating that one has to be asleep to believe it. In any event..................it was a fun quick read.

OPLJessG Jan 29, 2018

I know Hillary Clinton wrote "What Happened," but Amy Chua explains conflict along tribal identity, inequality, and foreign policy with precision and clarity. She revisits the failures in Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, and provides thoughtful context for today's rise in American nationalism. Riveting, persuasive, and remarkably readable; I couldn't put this down.

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