Effects of Wolf Predation on Recruitment of Black-tailed Deer on Northeastern Vancouver Island

Effects of Wolf Predation on Recruitment of Black-tailed Deer on Northeastern Vancouver Island

Microform - 1988
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Columbian black-tailed deer populations, one of the most popular big game species on northern Vancouver Island, showed marked declines during the 1970s, coincident with a major increase in numbers of wolves. This study tested the hypothesis that wolf predation was the primary cause. An area located within a moderate wolf density region on the Island was selected for intensive study from 1980-82. Deer were collected and each specimen was weighed and measured and tissue samples were taken. During September and November 1980/81 hunters were requested to have their deer weighed, measured, and the lower mandible removed for aging.
Publisher: Victoria : Ministry of Environment, Wildlife Branch, 1988
Description: 82 p. : ill
ISBN: 9780772609410
0772609411
Branch Call Number: MF BC-DOC 89-06168

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