The Fox's Walk

The Fox's Walk

Book - 2003
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Houghton
During the First World War, ten-year-old Alice Moore is left in the care of her autocratic grandmother at Ballydavid, a lovely country house in County Waterford. Living in a rigid, old-fashioned household where propriety is all, Alice is forced to piece together her world-a world on the brink of revolution-from overheard conversations, servants' gossip, and her own keen observations. She soon realizes that her family's privilege comes at a great cost to others-among them a psychic countess down on her luck, a Roman Catholic boy whom Alice hero-worships, and an admired governess, as well as most of her neighbors. After the Easter Rising, when blood is spilled close to home and loyalties are divided, tensions within Ireland and Ballydavid mount. Alice is forced to choose between her heritage of privilege and her growing moral and political conscience.

Our narrator Alice, a precocious pre-adolescent, puts together the world from what she can overhear in her traditional Anglo-Irish family. Sent to live at the country estate Ballydavid, County Waterford with her widowed Grandmother and Great Aunt after the death of a beloved uncle at the Front. During the war, Alice eavesdrops on the hushed conversations about the ferment among the locals in the Irish Nationalist Cause. Simultaneously, we get the story of Roger Casement's activities on behalf of the Cause. Though the Casement and Alice's paths never truly cross, the complex machinations of Casement mirror the sometimes mysterious relationships in Alice's household: O'Neil, the major domo whose Jewish arriviste, Nicolas Rowe, an Irish Catholic whose politics are diametrically opposed to those of Alice's family, and the mysterious Sonia, a white Russian "mystic" who inveigles her way into the household. In the end, Alice works out the puzzle of her society in her own way, and chooses the future, and what she feels is morally right, rather than cling to the dictates of the past.


Baker & Taylor
During World War I, a ten-year-old girl sent to live with her autocratic grandmother in the country gradually discovers that her family's privilege is purchased at great cost to many other people.

Harcourt Publishing
During the First World War, ten-year-old Alice Moore is left in the care of her autocratic grandmother at Ballydavid, a lovely country house in County Waterford. Living in a rigid, old-fashioned household where propriety is all, Alice is forced to piece together her world-a world on the brink of revolution-from overheard conversations, servants' gossip, and her own keen observations. She soon realizes that her family's privilege comes at a great cost to others-among them a psychic countess down on her luck, a Roman Catholic boy whom Alice hero-worships, and an admired governess, as well as most of her neighbors. After the Easter Rising, when blood is spilled close to home and loyalties are divided, tensions within Ireland and Ballydavid mount. Alice is forced to choose between her heritage of privilege and her growing moral and political conscience.

Our narrator Alice, a precocious pre-adolescent, puts together the world from what she can overhear in her traditional Anglo-Irish family. Sent to live at the country estate Ballydavid, County Waterford with her widowed Grandmother and Great Aunt after the death of a beloved uncle at the Front. During the war, Alice eavesdrops on the hushed conversations about the ferment among the locals in the Irish Nationalist Cause. Simultaneously, we get the story of Roger Casement's activities on behalf of the Cause. Though the Casement and Alice's paths never truly cross, the complex machinations of Casement mirror the sometimes mysterious relationships in Alice's household: O'Neil, the major domo whose Jewish arriviste, Nicolas Rowe, an Irish Catholic whose politics are diametrically opposed to those of Alice's family, and the mysterious Sonia, a white Russian "mystic" who inveigles her way into the household. In the end, Alice works out the puzzle of her society in her own way, and chooses the future, and what she feels is morally right, rather than cling to the dictates of the past.


Blackwell North Amer
Alice Moore is eight years old in 1915 when her parents leave her with her autocratic grandmother at Ballydavid, a beautiful old house in the south of Ireland. Often lonely and homesick, living in a rigid, old-fashioned household where more is said than is spoken, Alice is forced to piece together her world from overheard conversations, servants' gossip, and her own quiet observations.
Alice comes to love Ireland and to consider Ballydavid her home. She also comes to understand that her family's privilege is maintained at a cost to others and is based on prejudice, exclusion, and injustice to those outside the small closed circle of the Anglo-Irish. Outside the circle, but important in Alice's life are a psychic countess down on her luck, a Catholic boy whom Alice hero-worships, an admired governess, as well as many of their neighbors.
In the background always is the Great War. The sons of some of the local farm laborers serve in the English Army, but others, Irish Nationalists, are edging toward revolution. Sir Roger Casement, a revolutionary whose antecedents are not so different from Alice's, is actively working for the cause of Irish independence. In the aftermath of the rising, Casement is convicted of treason and hanged. Horrified by the lengths to which the English government will go to regain control over Ireland and divided in her loyalties and affections, Alice must finally choose between her heritage of privilege, her growing moral and political conscience, and the demands of the future.

Baker
& Taylor

During World War I, a ten-year-old girl sent to live with her autocratic grandmother in the country gradually discovers that her family's privilege is purchased at great cost to many other people. By the author of This Cold Country. 30,000 first printing.

Publisher: Orlando, Fla. : Harcourt, c2003
Edition: 1st ed
Description: viii, 319 p. ; 24 cm
ISBN: 9780151010202
015101020X
Branch Call Number: Davi

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PearlyKayAm1
Jul 14, 2014

Slow moving & dull. Gave up after 200 pages because finishing it wasn't good use of my time. Might be of interest to people who care about the gap between privileged classes and the underclass. Jane Austen fans might like this book.

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