Four Novels of the 1960s

Four Novels of the 1960s

Book - 2007
Average Rating:
Rate this:
6
Baker & Taylor
This Library of America volume brings together four of Dick's most original novels. The Man in the High Castle (1962), which won the Hugo Award, describes an alternate world in which Japan and Germany have won World War II and America is divided into separate occupation zones. The dizzying The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch (1965) posits a future in which competing hallucinogens proffer different brands of virtual reality, and an interplanetary drug tycoon can transform himself into a godlike figure transcending even physical death.

Blackwell North Amer
Known in his lifetime primarily to readers of science fiction, Philip K. Dick is now seen as a uniquely visionary figure, a writer who, in editor Jonathan Lethem’s words, “wielded a sardonic yet heartbroken acuity about the plight of being alive in the twentieth century, one that makes him a lonely hero to the readers who cherish him.”

This Library of America volume brings together four of Dick’s most original novels. The Man in the High Castle (1962), which won the Hugo Award, describes an alternate world in which Japan and Germany have won World War II and America is divided into separate occupation zones. The dizzying The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch (1965) posits a future in which competing hallucinogens proffer different brands of virtual reality, and an interplanetary drug tycoon can transform himself into a godlike figure transcending even physical death.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968), about a bounty hunter in search of escaped androids in a postapocalyptic society where status is measured by the possession of live animals and religious life is focused on a television personality, was the basis for the movie Blade Runner. Ubik (1969), with its future world of psychic espionage agents and cryonically frozen patients inhabiting an illusory “half-life,” pursues Dick’s theme of simulated realities and false perceptions to ever more disturbing conclusions, as time collapses on itself and characters stranded in past eras search desperately for the elusive, constantly shape-shifting panacea Ubik. As with most of Dick’s novels, no plot summary can suggest the mesmerizing and constantly surprising texture of these astonishing books.

Posing the questions “What is human?” and “What is real?” in a multitude of fascinating ways, Dick produced works—fantastic and weird, yet developed with precise logic, marked by wild humor and soaring flights of religious speculation—that are startlingly prescient imaginative anticipations of twenty-first-century quandaries.

LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation’s literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America’s best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.

Baker
& Taylor

A collection of four signature works by the visionary science fiction writer includes the titles, "The Man in the High Castle," "The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch," "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?," and "Ubik."
Published to coincide with the twenty-fifth anniversary re-release of the film Blade Runner, a collection of four signature works by the visionary science fiction writer includes the titles, The Man in the High Castle, The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, and Ubik.

Publisher: New York : Library of America, 2007
Description: 830 p. ; 21 cm
ISBN: 9781598530094
1598530097
Branch Call Number: Dick
Additional Contributors: Lethem, Jonathan

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

w
wiggumc
Sep 22, 2017

Mark,

Since when are sci-fi novels supposed to accurately predict the future? The are written by novelists, not psychics and even if they were written by psychics, they would still be wrong.

Marinetti Aug 06, 2014

Classic sci-fi novels.

n
nadooh
Feb 07, 2014

Actually, the novel talks about retina scans which we do have today. That's probably just a coincidence. It's not intended to be predictive in any way or fashion. It's science fiction rather than "scientific".

r
RyGuy86
Oct 15, 2012

You read 1/4 of this collection and gave it one star because it wasn't as "action-packed" as the movie version? Have you ever read a book before? It's a great book, and PKD is a great science fiction writer. Which is a distinct genre from action/adventure. If you don't think that the blurred line between human and artifical intelligence, reduced economic and social mobility, and an overbearing and all-powerful government intelligence agency don't have any relevance for our current society, then I'd argue that you're most likely in a vegetative coma. Here's a list of the predictions from Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and Minority Report (also a PKD book) that have come true/are on the verge of coming true: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-18026277

m
modestgoddess
Aug 11, 2012

I borrowed this because I wanted to read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and see where the movie Bladerunner came from. Very interesting to see how different book and movie are. Just goes to show that one can be made from another, the two can be almost completely different, and yet each is entirely worthy and engaging. Loved how important owning a real animal - any kind of real animal, even a spider or a fly or a toad - becomes in a post-nuclear world....

m
Mark Melnychuk
Jun 10, 2012

I only read Do Androids Dream Electronic sheep. Some regard this as a scientific classic. They must mean the movie Blade Runner. The novel had to be adapted and the title changed because it simply wasn't exciting enough. The action scenes in the novel are are about as exciting as reading a cookbook recipe. There is no suspense and Dick has had no success at all in predicting the future, which is here now and bears no resemblance to the novel. Waste of time.

Some of the others novels in the volume have better critical reputations.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at BPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top