Elric the Stealer of Souls

Elric the Stealer of Souls

Book - 2008
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Random House, Inc.
“The stories here are the raw heart of Michael Moorcock. They are the spells that first drew me and all the numerous admirers of his work with whom I am acquainted into Moorcock’s luminous and captivating web.”
–from the Foreword by Alan Moore, creator of V for Vendetta

When Michael Moorcock began chronicling the adventures of the albino sorcerer Elric, last king of decadent Melniboné, and his sentient vampiric sword, Stormbringer, he set out to create a new kind of fantasy adventure, one that broke with tradition and reflected a more up-to-date sophistication of theme and style. The result was a bold and unique hero–weak in body, subtle in mind, dependent on drugs for the vitality to sustain himself–with great crimes behind him and a greater destiny ahead: a rock-and-roll antihero who would channel all the violent excesses of the sixties into one enduring archetype.

Now, with a major film in development, here is the first volume of a dazzling collection of stories containing the seminal appearances of Elric and lavishly illustrated by award-winning artist John Picacio–plus essays, letters, maps, and other material. Adventures include “The Dreaming City,” “While the Gods Laugh,” “Kings in Darkness,” “Dead God’s Homecoming,” “Black Sword’s Brothers,” and “Sad Giant’s Shield.”

An indispensable addition to any fantasy collection, Elric: The Stealer of Souls is an unmatched introduction to a brilliant writer and his most famous–or infamous–creation.

“The most significant UK author of sword and sorcery, a form he has both borrowed from and transformed.”
–The Encyclopedia of Fantasy

Baker & Taylor
The first of six omnibus editions containing the long out-of-print adventures of Elric, the last ruler of the decadent empire of Melniboné, an albino drug addict in possession of a soul-drinking sword, features "The Stealer of Souls," "Stormbringer," essays on the character by the author, and other features. Original. 25,000 first printing.

Blackwell North Amer
When Michael Moorcock began chronicling the adventures of the albino sorcerer Elric, last king of decadent Melnibone, and his sentient vampiric sword, Stormbringer, he set out to create a new kind of fantasy adventure, one that broke with tradition and reflected a more up-to-date sophistication of theme and style. The result was a bold and unique hero - weak in body, subtle in mind, dependent on drugs for the vitality to sustain himself - with great crimes behind him and a greater destiny ahead: a rock-and-roll anti-hero who would channel all the violent excesses of the sixties into one enduring archetype.
Now, with a major film in development, here is the first volume of a dazzling collection of stories containing the seminal appearances of Elric and lavishly illustrated by award-winning artist John Picacio - plus essays, letters, maps, and other material. Adventures include "The Dreaming City," "While the Gods Laugh," "Kings in Darkness," "Dead God's Homecoming," "Black Sword's Brothers," and "Sad Giant's Shield."
An indispensable addition to any fantasy collection, Elric: The Stealer of Souls is an unmatched introduction to a brilliant writer and his most famous - or infamous - creation.

Baker
& Taylor

A volume of fantasy short stories about Elric, the king of Melinbonâe and his sword, Stormbringer, which includes "The Dreaming City," "While the Gods Laugh," "The Stealer of Souls," and "Kings in Darkness."

Publisher: New York : Del Rey Ballantine Books, c2008
Description: 458 p. : ill. ; 21 cm
ISBN: 9780345498625
Branch Call Number: Moor
Additional Contributors: Picacio, John.

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rswcove
May 31, 2016

This is the anti-Conan. A rock star anti-hero before such things existed, a byronic supervillain from a dark Atlantis- Elric of Melnibone was the great breath of fresh air after the dust of the pulp adventure novels became toxic and predictable. Moorcock's writing is florid and over wrought much like HP Lovecraft, to whom Moorcock owes much in style and world building. But the thing is that it works. This was fresh and new when it appeared, and although the world is now awash in characters built to imitate the original imitators of Elric of Melnibone, there is something powerful in the original that makes this well worth reading.

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