The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

Pre-loaded Audiobook - 2009
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Jay Gatsby is still in love with Daisy, whom he met during the war when he was penniless. Having made himself wealthy through illegal means, he now lives in a mansion across the bay from the home of Daisy Buchanan, who has since married for money. Holding on to his illusion of Daisy as perfect, he seeks to impress her with his wealth, and uses his new neighbor, Nick Carraway, (our narrator), to reach her. Daisy's wealthy but boring husband is cheating on her. When his mistress is killed in an accident caused by Daisy, Gatsby covers for her and takes the blame. The result is a murder and an ending which reveals the failure of money to buy love or happiness. Fitzgerald's elegantly simple work captures the spirit of the Jazz Age and embodies America's obsessions with wealth, power, and the promise of new beginnings.
Publisher: [Solon, Ohio] : Playaway Digital Audio : [Manufactured and distributed by] Findaway World, LLC, c2009
Edition: Unabridged
Description: 1 sound media player (5 hr.) : digital ; 3 3/8 x 2 1/8 in
ISBN: 9781433297595
Branch Call Number: SWPL Fitz

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maipenrai
Mar 14, 2021

Wow, how does one review The Great Gatsby. My primary response to the book is that I wish I could have read it with "new" eyes - that is, not knowing the story line. I believe the impact would have been so much stronger when the tragedies struck. Just a few comments. I had the feeling that two different people were writing the book. There were paragraphs of incomparable descriptive prose - wonderful images - great colors - infinite longing. Then suddenly you are into the actual narrative dialogue and the content is largely void of imagery and very stark. I found the abrupt switch somewhat disconcerting. My view of Gatsby changed from my impressions due to the films. I had seen him as this gorgeous, seeker of his first love. After reading the book I did not see him as a hero at all. I saw him as an obsessed man who would do anything to get what he wanted. In this case it was Daisy. Only one person in the book has a conscience. That is, of course, the narrator, Nick Carraway. He attempts to be part of the "suave" rich people he sees around him, but he never feels comfortable in this role. He attempts, in addition to telling the story, to "reason" with / mediate among Gatsby and the other main characters. In the end he is the only person to mourn the losses of lives and the death of aspirations. Daisy and Tom are shallow users of people. Daisy loves being wanted, but is not about to give up anything to be "true to her first love". Tom more blatantly uses people and throws them away, but you have to grudgingly admire his honesty about what a horrible human being he is. Jordan is largely an amoral chameleon - taking and using with no compunction. This is a tragedy worthy of Shakespeare. I have never forgotten my English lesson: pathos is when horrible events occur without being caused by the sufferer; tragedy is pain brought on by the person's own actions. Every main character of this story acts to produce the death and suffering, except for Nick. His story is pathos in that he experiences the devastation and loss without acting to cause it and with no ability to prevent it. This is by no means a literary review of Gatsby - I must leave that to my betters in the world of literature. It is simply a few thoughts after reading a book regarded as one of the best of the 20th century. Kristi & Abby Tabby

d
Daj_O
Apr 15, 2015

Superb writing and brilliant reading--a MUST-listen.

d
danielestes
Nov 18, 2012

Beautiful language. I can now say I've both read this book and listened to a reading of it, and there's so much complexity in the subtext that each time the tone suggested something slightly different.

Regarding the story itself, more of a short story really, it seemed to me somewhat unremarkable. My primary pleasure came from wanting to learn more about this mysterious man Gatsby, who he is and what motivates him.

The Great Gatsby is such an idolized staple of American literature that I grant myself several more re-reads to fully appreciate its genius.

s
sh5024
Sep 21, 2012

Outstanding audio version of this great American classic!

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