Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel

Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel

Technology and Invention in the Middle Ages

Book - 1994
Average Rating:
Rate this:
Baker & Taylor
A fascinating exploration of how Western Europe, after the chaos of the Dark Ages, rose to lead the world in technology examines how such inventions as the spinning wheel, the flying buttress, and the blast furnace helped create Western culture.

Book News
The authors shatter the popular myth that nothing of significance happened between 400 AD and 900 AD. Transportation was improved by the invention of harnesses, horse shoes, stirrups, the mariner's compass, round bottom ships, and systems of multiple masts. Water clocks and systems of weights and measures made their way to Europe from the Far East. Spinning wheels and printing presses were invented and became part of popular culture. The inventions, their inventors, and the impact on daily life are discussed. Illustrated with black and white photos. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.

Blackwell North Amer
In this account of Europe's rise to world leadership in technology, Frances and Joseph Gies make use of recent scholarship to destroy two time-honored myths. Myth One: that Europe's leap forward occurred suddenly in the "Renaissance," following centuries of medieval stagnation. Not so, say the Gieses: Early modern technology and experimental science were direct outgrowths of the decisive innovations of medieval Europe, in the tools and techniques of agriculture, craft industry, metallurgy, building construction, navigation, and war. Myth Two: that Europe achieved its primacy through "Western" superiority. On the contrary, the authors report, many of Europe's most important inventions - the horse harness, the stirrup, the magnetic compass, cotton and silk cultivation and manufacture, papermaking, firearms, "Arabic" numerals - had their origins outside Europe, in China, India, and Islam. The Gieses show how Europe synthesized its own innovations - the three-field system, water power in industry, the full-rigged ship, the putting-out system - into a powerful new combination of technology, economics, and politics.
From the expansion of medieval man's capabilities, the voyage of Columbus with all its fateful consequences is seen as an inevitable product, while even the genius of Leonardo da Vinci emerges from the context of earlier and lesser-known dreamers and tinkerers.
Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel is illustrated with more than 90 photographs and drawings. It is a Split Main Selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club.

Baker
& Taylor

An exploration of how Western Europe, after the chaos of the Dark Ages, rose to lead the world in technology examines such inventions as the spinning wheel, the flying buttress, and the blast furnace

Publisher: New York : HarperCollins Publishers, c1994
Edition: 1st ed
Description: 357 p. : ill. ; 22 cm
ISBN: 9780060165901
0060165901
Branch Call Number: 609.4 Gie
Additional Contributors: Gies, Joseph

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at BPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top