Borderless Economics

Borderless Economics

Chinese Sea Turtles, Indian Fridges and the New Fruits of Global Capitalism

Book - 2011
Average Rating:
2
1
Rate this:
"Today, thanks to the ease of technology and travel, we enjoy unprecendented levels of interconnectedness. Societies are increasingly mobile, and immigrant populations maintain strong ties with their native countries, allowing for an unbroken chain of innovation and knowledge that stretches all the way back home. Robert Guest, Global Business Editor for The Economist, shows how today's tribal networks transcend national borders, and how they are shaping the global community in unforeseen ways, including: *So-called "Chinese sea turtles," young Chinese who come to the West for college before returning to China, eagerly absorb democratic ideals along with their technical training. Now, as they assume leadership positions in Chinese government and business, they will slowly turn China democratic. *Indian diasporas, having long brought western technology to their home countries, are now bringing Indian technology to the West. They've already developed $70 refrigerators and $2,000 cars; their frugal innovations and managerial know-how are about to turn the global economy on its head. In a world where trade, trust, and information flow through ethnic networks, the nation that values open borders and encourages the growth of its diaspora populations will be the superpower of the twenty-first century. With on-the-ground reporting from dozens of countries, this is a timely look at the forces greater than national boundaries, and how they can be harnessed to move the whole planet forward"--Provided by publisher.
Publisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011
Edition: 1st ed
Description: 250 p. ; 25 cm
ISBN: 9780230113824
0230113826
Branch Call Number: 303.482 Gue

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

s
StarGladiator
Sep 10, 2014

///...they will slowly turn China democratic ..\\\ How many times have we been bombarded with this tired refrain over the past decades? ? Negative, Guest, instead of turning democratic, you fraudster, the Chinese elites have used their dissidents and pro-democracy activists as profit centers: executing them, harvesting their organs for profit, then preserving their bodies and charging American running dogs and Euro-fools to view them [Chinese Bodies Exhibitions]. And how do they entrap these activists? They are sold DPI technology from the Beijing office of Boeing subsidiary, Narus. Seems like both China and Corporate America are leaving anything democratic. Just a bunch of claptrap - - and yes, I am for migration and immigration, but no, under predatory capitalist systems it is not for the individuals' benefit, but profits the global banking cartel. Pure bunkem. Today one out of every two Americans - - according to the latest Census Burea data - - qualifies as poor. Today, the top banks are worth well over $7 trillion and more, while in 2006 they were worth $5.2 trillion [Chase, B of A, Citi, Wells Fargo], while workers' wages and equity have plummeted dramatically. Offshoring jobs, technology and investment to China and India doesn't benefit the majority of Americans, but does benefit those two countries, but most especially the multinational corporations.

p
paul1
Feb 22, 2012

Borderless Economics explains how countries that accept immigrants and the nations that alllow migration mutually benefit. Robert Guest demonstrates how migrants bring innovation and connections to their new homes and that many migrants send money back to provide for their relatives in the old country and if they return to their birthplace, they bring ideas back to help the nation of origin. This book also makes the case that the Chinese diaspora may bring democracy to China through the ideas that bring back with them. This is the type of writing that shows how important the free flow of people throughout the world is to improve the state of humanity. I note that in the United States, from 1959 to 2011(coinciding with the economic rise of non-U.S. nations), the poverty rate plummeted from 22% down to 15% http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poverty_in_the_United_States#mediaviewer/File:Number_in_Poverty_and_Poverty_Rate_1959_to_2011._United_States..PNG

Quotes

Add a Quote

p
paul1
Sep 21, 2014

*Indian diasporas, having long brought western technology to their home countries, are now bringing Indian technology to the West. They’ve already developed $70 refrigerators and $2,000 cars; their frugal innovations and managerial know-how are about to turn the global economy on its head.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at BPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top