The Thistle and the Drone

The Thistle and the Drone

How America's War on Terror Became A Global War on Tribal Islam

Book - 2013
Average Rating:
3
Rate this:
Baker & Taylor
A world-renowned author, diplomat and scholar reveals an adverse effect of the campaigns that fall under the umbrella term "The War on Terror"—the conflicts actually have exacerbated the already-broken relationship between central Islamic governments and the tribal societies within their borders.

Perseus Publishing

In the wake of the 9/11 attacks, the United States declared war on terrorism. More than ten years later, the results are decidedly mixed. Here world-renowned author, diplomat, and scholar Akbar Ahmed reveals an important yet largely ignored result of this war: in many nations it has exacerbated the already broken relationship between central governments and the largely rural Muslim tribal societies on the peripheries of both Muslim and non-Muslim nations. The center and the periphery are engaged in a mutually destructive civil war across the globe, a conflict that has been intensified by the war on terror.

Conflicts between governments and tribal societies predate the war on terror in many regions, from South Asia to the Middle East to North Africa, pitting those in the centers of power against those who live in the outlying provinces. Akbar Ahmed's unique study demonstrates that this conflict between the center and the periphery has entered a new and dangerous stage with U.S. involvement after 9/11 and the deployment of drones, in the hunt for al Qaeda, threatening the very existence of many tribal societies.

American firepower and its vast anti-terror network have turned the war on terror into a global war on tribal Islam. And too often the victims are innocent children at school, women in their homes, workers simply trying to earn a living, and worshipers in their mosques. Battered by military attacks or drone strikes one day and suicide bombers the next, the tribes bemoan, "Every day is like 9/11 for us."

In The Thistle and the Drone, the third volume in Ahmed's groundbreaking trilogy examining relations between America and the Muslim world, the author draws on forty case studies representing the global span of Islam to demonstrate how the U.S. has become involved directly or indirectly in each of these societies. The study provides the social and historical context necessary to understand how both central governments and tribal

Book News
Finding the agency and attitudes of the tribal societies of the Islamic world to be widely ignored in the so-called "war on terror," Ahmed (Islamic studies, American U. in Washington, DC) analyzes key elements of the conflict as pitting American attitudes represented by the casual use of military drones, against Islamic tribes of Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia, characterized--with reference to a metaphor from a Tolstoy short story--by the "thistle-like" qualities of love of freedom, egalitarianism, a tribal lineage system defined by common ancestors and clans, a martial tradition, and a highly developed code of honor and revenge. Adopting anthropological and historical perspectives towards understanding the role of the tribes, he begins his discussion by presenting a model of the culture of the tribes of Waziristan and considering its applicability to other groups, the balance between religion and tribal customs, tribal relations with the central state, tribal reactions towards US drone attacks, and the damaging and dangerous failures of US policy in the tribal regions. Annotation ©2013 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Baker
& Taylor

Argues that the campaigns that fall under "The War on Terror" have exacerbated the already-broken relationship between central Islamic governments and the tribal societies within their borders.

Brookings Institution Press

In the wake of the 9/11 attacks, the United States declared war on terrorism. More than ten years later, the results are decidedly mixed. Here world-renowned author, diplomat, and scholar Akbar Ahmed reveals an important yet largely ignored result of this war: in many nations it has exacerbated the already broken relationship between central governments and the largely rural Muslim tribal societies on the peripheries of both Muslim and non-Muslim nations. The center and the periphery are engaged in a mutually destructive civil war across the globe, a conflict that has been intensified by the war on terror.

Conflicts between governments and tribal societies predate the war on terror in many regions, from South Asia to the Middle East to North Africa, pitting those in the centers of power against those who live in the outlying provinces. Akbar Ahmed's unique study demonstrates that this conflict between the center and the periphery has entered a new and dangerous stage with U.S. involvement after 9/11 and the deployment of drones, in the hunt for al Qaeda, threatening the very existence of many tribal societies.

American firepower and its vast anti-terror network have turned the war on terror into a global war on tribal Islam. And too often the victims are innocent children at school, women in their homes, workers simply trying to earn a living, and worshipers in their mosques. Battered by military attacks or drone strikes one day and suicide bombers the next, the tribes bemoan, "Every day is like 9/11 for us."

In The Thistle and the Drone, the third volume in Ahmed's groundbreaking trilogy examining relations between America and the Muslim world, the author draws on forty case studies representing the global span of Islam to demonstrate how the U.S. has become involved directly or indirectly in each of these societies. The study provides the social and historical context necessary to understand how both central governments and tribal societies have become embroiled in America's war. Beginning with Waziristan and expanding to societies in Central Asia, the Middle East, North Africa, and elsewhere, Ahmed offers a fresh approach to the conflicts studied and presents an unprecedented paradigm for understanding and winning the war on terror.

The Thistle and the Drone was the 2013 Foreword Reviews Gold winner for Political Science.



Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Brookings Institution Press, c2013
Description: xi, 424 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm
ISBN: 9780815723783
Branch Call Number: 909.831 Ahm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Quotes

Add a Quote

s
SEBoiko
Jan 22, 2014

To be successful on the frontier a man has to deal with the hearts and minds of people, and not only with their fears.

s
SEBoiko
Jan 22, 2014

The body now became a weapon of mass destruction.

s
SEBoiko
Jan 22, 2014

A man's gun is his jewelry.

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at BPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top