The Apocalypse Codex

The Apocalypse Codex

Book - 2012
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"For outstanding heroism in the field (despite himself), computational demonologist Bob Howard is on the fast track for promotion to management within the Laundry, the supersecret British government agency tasked with defending the realm from occult threats. Assigned to External Assets, Bob discovers the company--unofficially--employs freelance agents to deal with sensitive situations that may embarrass Queen and Country. So when Ray Schiller--an American televangelist with the uncanny ability to miraculously heal the ill--becomes uncomfortably close to the Prime Minister, External Assets dispatches the brilliant, beautiful, and entirely unpredictable Persephone Hazard to infiltrate the Golden Promise Ministry and discover why the preacher is so interested in British politics. And it's Bob's job to make sure Persephone doesn't cause an international incident. But it's a supernatural incident that Bob needs to worry about--a global threat even the Laundry may be unable to clean up.."--
Publisher: New York : Ace Books, 2012
Edition: 1st ed
Description: 326 p. ; 24 cm
ISBN: 9781937007461
1937007464
Branch Call Number: Stro

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SCL_Justin Aug 16, 2017

Short orientation: The Laundry is a British governmental department dealing with “things humans were not meant to know.” It turns out the multiverse is leaky and math that looks like magic (and that’s much easier to do with late 20th-early 21st century computing power) can summon tentacly beasts and other malign entities from nearby or far realities. The Laundry tries to clean up those messes.

The Apocalypse Codex is about infiltrating an American megachurch that has some heretical beliefs (involving waking sleeping gods and putting mind-control bugs in people who don’t buy into the theology willingly). This is also the first of the novels that has Bob in a management role. I appreciated the “learning how to let your team to the job” aspects, though Bob does get to do some stuff himself too.

My biggest problem with the book is the scale of the aftermath. Big things happen to thousands of people in Colorado in this story and I would think dealing with that would be difficult at the least, so I hope it’s not swept under the rug. Stross usually is pretty good about following up on aftermath so I’m not too worried.

The other problem with this book was that there wasn’t enough Mo (from the earlier Laundry Files books), and there was a Mo substitute. I understand why the story needed someone other than Mo in the badass superspy role, but that Persephone Hazard was so undifferentiated from Mo made it fall a little flat. The characters in general felt more plot-expedient than actual people, but maybe that’s just familiarity wearing through.

t
thedoggedtruth
Jun 13, 2016

I love the Laundry files

s
StephenB
Apr 04, 2013

Wonderful, the best Laundry novel to date. Love what he does with the Colorado Springs religious nuts.

r
rene1951
Oct 02, 2012

This is obviously the end of the series. Will there be a new series featuring Bob Howard and or the LAUNDRY (QUESTION MARK). Now August 2015, one more Bob Howard novel: the Rhesus chart; and one (to date) featuring is wife Dr. Dominique O'Brien: the annihilation score. P.S. Shows a deeply (and subtle) humorous insight into how bureaucracies work, at least at the mid-level management point of view.

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