The Skull in the Rock

The Skull in the Rock

How A Scientist, A Boy, and Google Earth Opened A New Window on Human Origins

Book - 2012
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Random House, Inc.
From the fossil hunter who discovered the Homo naledi fossils in September 2015, this book is an amazing account of Lee Berger’s 2008 hunt -- with the help of his curious 9-year-old son -- for a previously unknown species of ape-like creatures that may have been direct ancestors of modern humans. The discovery of two remarkably well preserved, two-million-year-old fossils of an adult female and young male, known as Australopiitecus sediba, has been hailed as one of the most important archaeological discoveries in history. The fossils reveal what may be one of humankind's oldest ancestors.

Berger believes the skeletons they found on the Malapa site in South Africa could be the "Rosetta stone that unlocks our understanding of the genus Homo" and may just redesign the human family tree.

Berger, an Eagle Scout and National Geographic Grantee, is the Reader in Human Evolution and the Public Understanding of Science in the Institute for Human Evolution at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

The focus of the book will be on the way in which we can apply new thinking to familiar material and come up with a breakthrough. Marc Aronson is particularly interested in framing these issues for young people and has had enormous success with this approach in his previous books: Ain't Nothing But a Man and If Stones Could Speak.

Berger's discovery in one of the most excavated and studied areas on Earth revealed a treasure trove of human fossils--and an entirely new human species--where people thought no more field work might ever be necessary. Technology and revelation combined, plus a good does of luck, to broaden by ten times the number of early human fossils known, rejuvenating this field of study and posing countless more questions to be answered in years and decades to come.



Releases simultaneously in Reinforced Library Binding: 978-1-4263-1053-9 , $27.90/$32.00 Can


From the Hardcover edition.

Baker & Taylor
A collaboration by an award-winning author and the paleontologist renowned for the discovery of Australopithecus sidiba chronicles the riveting story behind one of the most significant archaeological discoveries of all time, explaining its significance for understanding human evolution and how it is shaping the thinking of the scientific community.

Publisher: Washington, D.C. : National Geographic, 2012
Description: 64 p. : col. ill., col. map ; 29 cm
ISBN: 9781426310539
9781426310102
Branch Call Number: j569.9 Ber
Additional Contributors: Aronson, Marc

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While scientist Lee Berger used Google Earth to find places to look for early human fossils, it was actually his 9-year-old son who spotted the clavicle of a young male who died two million years ago. Photographs.

ChristchurchLib Jan 22, 2013

"Can you imagine what it would be like to discover a previously unknown species? This fascinating and abundantly illustrated book tells the story of how 9-year-old Matthew Berger - with the help of his scientist dad and Google Earth - did exactly that. Describing not only this very important discovery of a pair of two-million-year-old fossils of an adult female and young male, known as Australopithecus sediba, but also telling a bit of Matthew's dad's life story and how he became a paleoanthropologist, this book is a must-read for science buffs." January 2013 Kids' Books Newsletter http://www.nextreads.com/Display2.aspx?SID=5acc8fc1-4e91-4ebe-906d-f8fc5e82a8e0&N=594050

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