Independence

Independence

The Struggle to Set America Free

Book - 2011
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Baker & Taylor
Traces the political disputes that surrounded America's 1776 Declaration of Independence, offering insight into the views of Parliament sympathizers and colonists who stayed loyal to Britain.

McMillan Palgrave

No event in American history was more pivotal-or more furiously contested-than Congress's decision to declare independence in July 1776. Even months after American blood had been shed at Lexington and Concord, many colonists remained loyal to Britain. John Adams, a leader of the revolutionary effort, said bringing the fractious colonies together was like getting "thirteen clocks to strike at once."



Other books have been written about the Declaration, but no author has traced the political journey from protest to Revolution with the narrative scope and flair of John Ferling. Independence takes readers from the cobblestones of Philadelphia into the halls of Parliament, where many sympathized with the Americans and furious debate erupted over how to deal with the rebellion. Independence is not only the story of how freedom was won, but how an empire was lost.



At this remarkable moment in history, high-stakes politics was intertwined with a profound debate about democracy, governance, and justice. John Ferling, drawing on a lifetime of scholarship, brings this passionate struggle to life as no other historian could. Independence will be hailed as the finest work yet from the author Michael Beschloss calls "a national resource."



Book News
Ferling (history, U. of West Georgia), author of many books on Revolutionary War era America, traces the evolution of the idea of independence and the events and decisions that ultimately led Congress, with the support of most Americans, to declare independence. The book evaluates key players in the process, both important members of the Continental Congress, many of whom were deeply divided about which course to pursue up until July 1776, and important British ministers and their principal adversaries in Parliament. American independence was not inevitable, Ferling asserts, but the result of a protracted struggle in America over how best to secure the interests of individual colonies and of the North American empire, and in Great Britain over how best to hold their power in North America. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Baker
& Taylor

Traces the political disputes that surrounded America's 1776 Declaration of Independence, offering insight into the views of Parliament sympathizers and colonists who stayed loyal to Britain. By the best-selling author of The Ascent of George Washington. 50,000 first printing.

Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury Press, 2011
Edition: 1st U.S. ed
Description: xii, 434 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm
ISBN: 9781608190089
1608190080
Branch Call Number: 973.3 Fer

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