Farewell, Fred Voodoo

Farewell, Fred Voodoo

A Letter From Haiti

Book - 2013
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Wilentz traces the country's history from its slave plantations through its turbulent revolutionary history, its kick-up-the-dirt guerrilla movements, its totalitarian dynasty that ruled for decades, and its long and always troubled relationship with the United States. Yet through a history of hardship shines Haiti's creative culture--its African traditions, its French inheritance, and its uncanny resilience, a strength that is often confused with resignation. Haiti emerged from the dust of the 2010 earthquake like a powerful spirit, and this stunning book describes the country's day-to-day struggle and its relationship to outsiders who come to help out. There are human-rights reporters gone awry, movie stars turned aid workers, priests and musicians running for president, doctors turned diplomats. A former U.S. president works as a house builder and voodoo priests try to control elections. A foreign correspondent on a simple story becomes, over time and in the pages of this book, a lover of Haiti, pursuing the essence of this beautiful and confounding land into its darkest and brightest corners. "Farewell, Fred Voodoo "is a spiritual journey into the heart of the human soul, and Haiti has found in Amy Wilentz an author of astonishing wit, sympathy, and eloquence.
Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, 2013
Edition: 1st Simon & Schuster hardcover ed
Description: xiv, 329 p. ; 24 cm
ISBN: 9781451643978
1451643977
9781451644005
1451644000
9781451644074
1451644078
Branch Call Number: 972.94 Wil

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1tarheel
Jan 28, 2015

Really indescribable, much like Haiti itself. Wilentz writes with balance and compassion while struggling to explain this profoundly broken society (for which, by the way, the US bears much of the blame). A MUST-read for anyone exploring the Caribbean or, frankly, any developing nation.

ChristchurchLib Feb 09, 2014

""Fred Voodoo" is the joking, catch-all name that reporters used to call the man on the street in Haiti. Veteran journalist Amy Wilentz, who's been fascinated by and reporting on the poverty-stricken country for almost 30 years, is happy to say goodbye to that moniker and show readers some of the fascinating individuals she's met, including parents, priests, and presidents. Describing Haiti's turbulent history, and taking a particularly close look at the devastating 2010 earthquake, she provides an unsentimental yet loving look at a troubled land. This "excellent and illuminating" (Los Angeles Times) book is one of five on the short list for the 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award in Autobiography; winners will be announced on March 13. For more on post-earthquake Haiti, try Jonathan M. Katz's The Big Truck That Went By." Armchair Travel February 2014 newsletter http://www.libraryaware.com/996/NewsletterIssues/ViewIssue/65a45623-29d8-4930-a050-7045f18b95cf?postId=fbfe1dbc-f888-4b7d-a453-8350c366f628

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